Federal Budget and Appropriations



Appropriations Update

Mark Harkins | November 4, 2019

Here we go again. To keep the government funded past the start of the fiscal year on October 1st, Congress passed a Continuing Resolution (CR) that lasts until November 21st. Over the last decade, during non-election years, it has taken, on average, SIX months into the fiscal year before all 12 appropriations bills have been


Back In Session

Laura Blessing | September 11, 2019

Congress is back in session, and all eyes are on the impending budget negotiations.  The past month has not provided a respite from significant news.  A number of mass shootings, border developments, and the clattering of the 2020 presidential aspirants reminds us that while Congress may have escaped the Potomac’s heat, the world does not


Limitation Provisions in Appropriations bills: A Key Tool of Congressional Policymaking

Matt Glassman | May 6, 2019

Early last week, the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies released its draft FY2020 bill, and subsequently approved it in a markup held on Wednesday. In some respects, this was all very normal; the MilCon bill (as it is widely known) is often one of the first appropriations


Four Things to Consider About a Possible Second Government Shutdown

Matt Glassman | February 5, 2019

The FY2019 appropriations process in Congress—which will provide funding for the federal government from October 1, 2018, until September 30, 2019—is once again approaching a deadline. After managing to pass five of the twelve annual appropriations bills in two “mini-bus” packages in late September, Congress passed two continuing resolutions (the first through December


The Aftermath

Laura Blessing | December 6, 2018

Another election cycle has washed over our nation’s capital.  As outgoing members clear out their desks and incoming members eye their new offices, Congress gets ready for the next phase.  It’s time to adjust to the aftermath of the election results, their ongoing appropriations work, other lame duck session policy attempts, a budget process


November is a time of change (to your budgets)

Josh Huder | November 1, 2018

November is a beautiful month of transition. The air is cooler. The leaves are turning.  And because it’s an even-numbered year, the change is particularly jarring on Capitol Hill. Appropriators are wrapping up their business while Americans are electing a new Congress. The confluence of elections and appropriations in November is fitting because the election


Five Cheers for the FY19 Appropriations Process

Matt Glassman | October 1, 2018

The 2019 federal fiscal year begins Monday, October 1st. To the surprise of many, the FY2019 appropriations process in Congress resulted in on-time passage of several of the annual appropriations bills. On September 21, President Trump signed the FY2019 Consolidated Appropriations Act, which contained the annual appropriations for three of the traditional twelve


Budget Dysfunction: Potential Reforms

Laura Blessing | July 11, 2018

The federal budget process, laid out in the 1974 Budget Act, is a complex, multi-stage process with many opportunities for partisanship and intra-party divisions to derail it. And derailed it has been, with workarounds like omnibus appropriations and Continuing Resolutions (CRs) becoming the new normal. The myriad challenges in the present-day process were discussed at length in


Budget Reform: Diagnosing the Problem

Laura Blessing | May 3, 2018

The federal budget process is broken.  There are few things that political actors across the spectrum agree on; the deep dysfunctionality of congressional budgeting is one.  This topic has received considerable attention in recent years, most recently via a joint select committee created to seek reforms.  The  need for such an investigation


Art of the Very Difficult Budget Deal

Josh Huder | January 18, 2018

Three months into the 2018 fiscal year, Congress and the President have yet to finalize a budget deal. Delayed funding of government is not new to this Congress or its predecessors. Similar debates about how much to raise the Budget Control Act (BCA) caps (commonly referred to as sequester) occurred in 2013 and 2015, and


1 2 3 6