Congress in 2018: What’s left?

Josh Huder | March 5, 2018

Last month Congress struck a two-year deal that greases the budget wheels to the tune of an extra $320 billion. While political posturing and two brief government shutdowns hampered bipartisan negotiations, congressional leaders in the House and Senate ultimately settled on a budget that outlines discretionary spending, lifts the Budget Control Act’s(aka sequestration) caps

Senior Fellow Josh Huder published a piece in Politico

GAI | January 25, 2018

GAI Senior Fellow recently published a piece in Politico discussing what was gained and lost in last week’s weekend shutdown. You can read the entire piece here .

Art of the Very Difficult Budget Deal

Josh Huder | January 18, 2018

Three months into the 2018 fiscal year, Congress and the President have yet to finalize a budget deal. Delayed funding of government is not new to this Congress or its predecessors. Similar debates about how much to raise the Budget Control Act (BCA) caps (commonly referred to as sequester) occurred in 2013 and 2015, and

Senior Fellow Mark Harkins on The HILL AM View Podcast

GAI | January 10, 2018

GAI Senior Fellow Mark Harkins was a guest this morning on The Hill AM View Podcast. He and correspondent Alexis Simendinger discussed the value of earmarks as a legislative technique. Interesting discussion in light of recent comments by President Trump expressing enthusiasm for bringing back this congressional practice.

Outlook for the FY2018 Appropriations Process

Matt Glassman | January 9, 2018

The FY2018 appropriations process in Congress—which will provide funding for the federal government from October 1, 2017, until September 30, 2018—is once again approaching a deadline. After its failure to enact full year appropriations bills by October 1, Congress has passed a series of continuing resolutions (the first through December 8; a

Victims of Their Own Success

Laura Blessing | December 21, 2017

The Republican Party has become a victim of its own success.  Given their legislative, administrative, and impending electoral challenges, this may sound odd.  But on their biggest policy priority, tax policy, they may have been too successful.  And those previous successes combined with the tax bill passed this week may just imperil their reputation as

At the Water’s Edge: Is House Intelligence Oversight As Good As It Gets?

Katina Slavkova | December 18, 2017

There is a common adage in national security and foreign policy debates that “partisan politics stop at the water’s edge.” This famous statement was first coined by the influential chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Sen. Arthur Vandenberg (R-MI) who, at the outset of the Cold War, overcame his political

GAI Podcast Episode 2

GAI | December 15, 2017

Tune in for our second podcast episode where Laura, Josh, and Matt discuss the Alabama election, the tax reform package that is currently winding its way through conference, and the prospects for federal spending beyond December 22 when the current continuing resolution is set to expire.

R.I.P. Budget Hawks

Mark Harkins | November 20, 2017

November 16, 2017, will be a day long remembered in the annals of Congressional history. Not because of the Franken picture or the fact that Sen. Menendez’s trial ended in a hung jury or even that Roy Moore had another revival press conference. No, this day will be remembered as the day the budget hawks

Senior Fellow Mark Harkins in the News

GAI | November 18, 2017

In light of the just passed tax bill in the House, Senior Fellow Mark Harkins offers some insights in the Las Vegas Review-Journal on how President Trump is learning to work with Congress.“It seems that it’s easier for Congress to move these large, difficult bills when they have less guidance from the executive branch.” You

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