Revise & Extend



Appropriations Update

Mark Harkins | November 4, 2019

Here we go again. To keep the government funded past the start of the fiscal year on October 1st, Congress passed a Continuing Resolution (CR) that lasts until November 21st. Over the last decade, during non-election years, it has taken, on average, SIX months into the fiscal year before all 12 appropriations bills have been


Impeachment Politics Requires a Different Vote Calculator

Josh Huder | October 9, 2019

Anyone who watched School House Rock knows how bills become law. From a numbers standpoint, it is straightforward.  It needs 218 votes in the House, 51 votes in the Senate (60 to cut off a filibuster), and a presidential signature. Given this math, some wonder why Speaker Pelosi is hesitating to pass a resolution—which


What comes next in the impeachment inquiry?

Matt Glassman | October 3, 2019

Last week, following a whistleblower complaint about certain foreign affairs actions taken by the White House, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi announced that the House was beginning an “official impeachment inquiry” into President Trump. Pelosi directed six House committees to put together their case for potential impeachment and forward them to the


Back In Session

Laura Blessing | September 11, 2019

Congress is back in session, and all eyes are on the impending budget negotiations.  The past month has not provided a respite from significant news.  A number of mass shootings, border developments, and the clattering of the 2020 presidential aspirants reminds us that while Congress may have escaped the Potomac’s heat, the world does not


Lessons In Impeachment

Laura Blessing | June 5, 2019

In politics, we often learn the lesson of the last time. When President Obama came into office, he and his advisors read Gordon Goldstein’s Lessons in Disaster, which covered mistakes made in Vietnam, to apply them to Afghanistan and Iraq.  The enduring legacy of these conflicts is the power vacuum that enabled the rise


GAI in the News

GAI | May 8, 2019

Senior Fellow Mark Harkins discusses the current dust up between House Democrats and the President regarding subpoenas and oversight. Here is the entire article in the Las Vegas Review-Journal.


The New Majority and Historic Interbranch Conflict: New Members May Drag Their Feet

Josh Huder | May 7, 2019

House Democrats and President Trump are on a collision course. Democrats demand the administration and others comply with their subpoenas and document requests on everything from the president’s tax returns and business records to the unredacted Mueller report. So far, President Trump has uniformly refused, an unprecedented move that directly threatens congressional power and authorities.


Limitation Provisions in Appropriations bills: A Key Tool of Congressional Policymaking

Matt Glassman | May 6, 2019

Early last week, the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies released its draft FY2020 bill, and subsequently approved it in a markup held on Wednesday. In some respects, this was all very normal; the MilCon bill (as it is widely known) is often one of the first appropriations


Director’s Desk

Kristin Nicholson | April 1, 2019

Dear Friends: Happy spring! While cherry blossoms steal the show outdoors, a buzz of activity continues inside the Capitol complex. A slew of committees are holding hearings on the FY2020 budget, with Cabinet members and other officials making the trek to the Hill to defend the President’s funding requests. However, it looks


The origins of the House’s special rules and what it means for the Senate rules change

Josh Huder | April 1, 2019

Procedurally, the House and Senate could not be more different. The House is subject to absolute majority rule. Conversely, the Senate is governed by more bipartisan processes like unlimited debate, supermajority cloture, and unanimous consent. However, the two chambers have become more similar in recent years. Partisan House members moving to the Senate have helped


1 2 3 23