Revise & Extend Blog



Revise and Extend is a blog dedicated to providing practical and academic perspectives on congressional policy, politics, and procedure. Managed by the faculty and staff at the Government Affairs Institute at Georgetown University, and in line with our organization’s mission, we hope this blog is an important source of information for individuals wanting to know more about congressional operations, member behavior, and, more broadly, American politics.

GAI is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, conducting courses on Capitol Hill since 1965. For thirty years, GAI was part of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. In 1995 GAI was privatized by the federal government, and in 1997 it became affiliated with Georgetown University and the McCourt School of Public Policy. GAI’s mission is to provide education and training about congressional processes, organization, and practices, and about selected legislative policy issues.

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Latest Posts

The Long Shadow of 2010

Laura Blessing | January 9, 2020

The dawning of a new decade brings the expected retrospectives. While algorithms compute our most listened-to songs and pundits connect the latest torrential news cycle to a loose historical pattern, finding the signal amidst the noise can be elusive.  Periodization schemes can be difficult to pin down.  But arguably, a decade is precisely the right

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National Security Oversight: Still a Man’s World

Katina Slavkova | December 5, 2019

Women’s representation has made significant gains in politics. Women are major contenders for the Presidency and are increasingly winning office at the national, state, and local levels. Women comprising a quarter of Congress may be small in an absolute sense, but it is truly historic. Yet within the legislative branch, that influence is not felt

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Appropriations Update

Mark Harkins | November 4, 2019

Here we go again. To keep the government funded past the start of the fiscal year on October 1st, Congress passed a Continuing Resolution (CR) that lasts until November 21st. Over the last decade, during non-election years, it has taken, on average, SIX months into the fiscal year before all 12 appropriations bills have been

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Impeachment Politics Requires a Different Vote Calculator

Josh Huder | October 9, 2019

Anyone who watched School House Rock knows how bills become law. From a numbers standpoint, it is straightforward.  It needs 218 votes in the House, 51 votes in the Senate (60 to cut off a filibuster), and a presidential signature. Given this math, some wonder why Speaker Pelosi is hesitating to pass a resolution—which

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