Leadership



Democrats in disarray? The surprisingly normal politics of infrastructure negotiations

Matt Glassman | September 8, 2021

On August 24th, the House adopted S.Con.Res.14, the congressional budget resolution for Fiscal Year 2022 previously adopted by the Senate on August 11th, setting up consideration of a $3.5T package of spending under the reconciliation process. The budget resolution was adopted 220-212 in the House and 50-49 in the Senate, with every Democrat


The Importance of the Congressional Calendar

Katina Slavkova | July 7, 2021

Halfway through its first session, the 117th Congress finds itself in familiar territory, one that past Congresses know all too well. The crush of ambitious and unfinished legislative business is threatening to overwhelm Capitol Hill’s notoriously tricky and fickle schedule. Call it the tyranny of the congressional calendar. Here we’ll consider


Stretching Processes and Avoiding Reform: Senate Reconciliation and Filibuster

Josh Huder | April 8, 2021

News dropped Monday the Senate Parliamentarian would allow Democrats to “revise” the budget resolution for fiscal year 2021. This is an important guidance because it would enable Democrats to pursue another round of reconciliation – a process outlined in the 1974 Budget and Impoundment Control Act allowing for Senate passage of budget-related


Three dynamics to watch in the 117th Congress

Matt Glassman | February 1, 2021

The 117th Congress began in earnest on January 20th with the swearing-in of President Biden. Here are three political dynamics to keep an eye on in the coming weeks. Party government vs. bipartisanship. The 117th Congress begins with the Democrats having majorities in both the House and Senate. This makes President Biden the fifth President


Norms, Precedents and Senate Confirmation

Josh Huder | October 2, 2020

The Supreme Court vacancy created by Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s passing has thrust the Senate’s constitutional confirmation function into an already chaotic 2020 election cycle. Senate Majority Leader McConnell appears poised for a pre-election rush to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett—in direct contravention of his previous statements about confirming Supreme Court nominees in election years and


Social Movements and Policy Change

Laura Blessing | September 8, 2020

How should we understand the fire this time?  In the wake of the police murder of George Floyd, a movement has re-ignited for civil rights in general and against police brutality specifically.  August 28 saw a March on Washington, 57 years after the original march with MLK’s famous “I have a dream” speech to crowds


Congress in Crisis is Congress at Work

Matt Glassman | April 1, 2020

In response to the global coronavirus pandemic, three major bills were passed by Congress and signed into law by President Trump in March. On March 6, the president signed into law H.R.6074, an $8.3 billion supplemental appropriations bill, mostly aimed at providing additional funding for the Department of Health and Human Services to combat coronavirus.


Impeachment Politics Requires a Different Vote Calculator

Josh Huder | October 9, 2019

Anyone who watched School House Rock knows how bills become law. From a numbers standpoint, it is straightforward.  It needs 218 votes in the House, 51 votes in the Senate (60 to cut off a filibuster), and a presidential signature. Given this math, some wonder why Speaker Pelosi is hesitating to pass a resolution—which


The Aftermath

Laura Blessing | December 6, 2018

Another election cycle has washed over our nation’s capital.  As outgoing members clear out their desks and incoming members eye their new offices, Congress gets ready for the next phase.  It’s time to adjust to the aftermath of the election results, their ongoing appropriations work, other lame duck session policy attempts, a budget process


Can Pelosi flip enough votes? Probably not without conceding her job.

Josh Huder | November 28, 2018

The attempted Pelosi ouster is crumbling. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) heads into today’s Democratic Caucus leadership elections unopposed in the race for Speaker. However, her quest for the gavel isn’t over. Pelosi needs a majority of those “voting for speaker by name” to prevail when the full House votes in January. Winning


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