House



GAI in the News

GAI | May 8, 2019

Senior Fellow Mark Harkins discusses the current dust up between House Democrats and the President regarding subpoenas and oversight. Here is the entire article in the Las Vegas Review-Journal.


The origins of the House’s special rules and what it means for the Senate rules change

Josh Huder | April 1, 2019

Procedurally, the House and Senate could not be more different. The House is subject to absolute majority rule. Conversely, the Senate is governed by more bipartisan processes like unlimited debate, supermajority cloture, and unanimous consent. However, the two chambers have become more similar in recent years. Partisan House members moving to the Senate have helped


Congressional Oversight in the 116th

Laura Blessing | March 8, 2019

Congressional oversight in the 116th Congress has gotten off to a roaring start.  After two years of unified government in the Trump administration, Democrats are eager to begin looking into a long list of topics now that they have retaken the House.  The news cycle, already moving at an exhausting pace, now regularly features oversight efforts


In Search of Good Intelligence Oversight

Katina Slavkova | January 9, 2019

After a moment of pomp and circumstance to accompany the swearing-in of the new Congress, the 116th Congress quickly pivoted to the less glamorous work of legislating. The most immediate concern for Democrats, who now control the House of Representatives, is to end a partial government shutdown that has dragged on for


At the Water’s Edge: Is House Intelligence Oversight As Good As It Gets?

Katina Slavkova | December 18, 2017

There is a common adage in national security and foreign policy debates that “partisan politics stop at the water’s edge.” This famous statement was first coined by the influential chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Sen. Arthur Vandenberg (R-MI) who, at the outset of the Cold War, overcame his political


How long will the “open process” last?

Josh Huder | February 3, 2016

During the Republican retreat two weeks ago Speaker Ryan doubled down on his commitment open the process in the House. The original pledge was offered to satisfy conservative members’ desire for greater input and influence. Anyone with a deliberative-democratic bone in their body should welcome this change and the pledge. However, it comes with


Regular order: Republicans’ risky venture into open debate

Josh Huder | December 1, 2015

Members in the House are calling for regular order. If you have no idea what “regular order” means, don’t worry. You’re not alone. In fact, you’re probably in the company of many members of Congress. Calls for regular order are almost as old as the institution itself. In theory, regular order is open, deliberative processes


How John Boehner would Lose his Job: He Chooses to.

Josh Huder | September 24, 2015

This is the week Speaker John Boehner will supposedly face a vote to remove him from the speakership on the House floor. Don’t buy the hype. Amid multiple headlines claiming Speaker Boehner is facing his most strident rebellion yet, it’s important to keep the procedural context in mind. The only way John Boehner will vacate


Conservatives’ Playcalling: Hail Mary… Repeat.

(Hail Mary, noun, 2. (FOOTBALL) a very long, typically unsuccessful pass made in a desperate attempt to score late in the game.) It appears Speaker Boehner may have another rebellion on his hands. Will this be the toughest challenge to his speakership? Maybe. That is if you don’t include the last two speakership elections,


The budget rule is uncommon but (small ‘d’) democratic

The House budget proposal is being brought to the floor under an uncommon rule called the queen-of-the-hill. It’s being framed as quirkyodd and, at times, a signal of Republican dysfunction. However, it perhaps best described as a release valve. Under the queen-of-the-hill process multiple amendments (which is a full substitute bill) are


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