Elections



Three dynamics to watch in the 117th Congress

Matt Glassman | February 1, 2021

The 117th Congress began in earnest on January 20th with the swearing-in of President Biden. Here are three political dynamics to keep an eye on in the coming weeks. Party government vs. bipartisanship. The 117th Congress begins with the Democrats having majorities in both the House and Senate. This makes President Biden the fifth President


Elections Matter

Matt Glassman | November 2, 2020

On Tuesday, the United States will hold its 117th biennial federal election to fill seats in the House of Representatives and Senate, as well as its 59th quadrennial election to fill the office of President of the United States. Representatives elected will serve in the 117th Congress, from January 3, 2021 until January 3, 2023;


You’ve Got Mail: Voting in a Pandemic

Susan Sullivan Lagon | June 3, 2020

The pandemic has disrupted many things, including voting, the practice of democracy itself. As state primaries go by and the country gears up for November, some states are more ready for mail-in voting than others. Meanwhile, false claims have been circulated about mail-in voting having a partisan advantage (it doesn’t) or being


The Aftermath

Laura Blessing | December 6, 2018

Another election cycle has washed over our nation’s capital.  As outgoing members clear out their desks and incoming members eye their new offices, Congress gets ready for the next phase.  It’s time to adjust to the aftermath of the election results, their ongoing appropriations work, other lame duck session policy attempts, a budget process


November is a time of change (to your budgets)

Josh Huder | November 1, 2018

November is a beautiful month of transition. The air is cooler. The leaves are turning.  And because it’s an even-numbered year, the change is particularly jarring on Capitol Hill. Appropriators are wrapping up their business while Americans are electing a new Congress. The confluence of elections and appropriations in November is fitting because the election


Looking Towards 2017: National Security in Focus

GAI | December 1, 2016

With the election over and cabinet hopefuls parading to Trump Tower, political prognosticators are looking towards 2017.  What will the incoming presidential administration and unified Republican government mean for policy and politics?  The congressional experts at GAI are weighing in with a series of deeper dives on different subject areas.  Below are the contributions for


Political parties are often too convenient an explanation

Josh Huder | April 28, 2015

Teagan Goddard asked the question, can politics be “unbundled” from political parties? In other words, if there is a market where we can unbundle phone and internet service, why isn’t there a market to unbundle politics from parties? Hans Noel wrote an excellent piecedescribing how the electoral and governing process


Is Seat Flipping in the Senate a Big Deal?

A lot is being said about the historic nature of Republicans flipping 8-9 Senate seats and beating four incumbent Democrats (and possibly as many as five by December) during the election of 2014.  However, that’s not terribly unusual in the Senate.  Of the current Members of the Senate, 48 won their seats either by


Income inequality did not affect the midterms – unless this was a very weird election.

Democrats are searching for explanations to Tuesday’s thorough defeat. Aside from obvious considerations – low turnout, 6th year election, etc. – there are several arguments that the economy was a big reason Democrats lost so thoroughly. It was polled, once again, as the most important issue concerning voters this election. However, this stance presents a


Midterm Elections Update

With Republicans likely winning a Senate majority in today’s elections, it’s worth examining whether there are parallels to what happened in 2006 when Democrats reclaimed the majority in the House following 12 years of Republican rule. As you may recall, 2006 was, like 2014, a “six-year itch” cycle. That is, an off-year election in the


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