Congressional Policy Issues



Back In Session

Laura Blessing | September 11, 2019

Congress is back in session, and all eyes are on the impending budget negotiations.  The past month has not provided a respite from significant news.  A number of mass shootings, border developments, and the clattering of the 2020 presidential aspirants reminds us that while Congress may have escaped the Potomac’s heat, the world does not


GAI in the News

GAI | May 8, 2019

Senior Fellow Mark Harkins discusses the current dust up between House Democrats and the President regarding subpoenas and oversight. Here is the entire article in the Las Vegas Review-Journal.


Limitation Provisions in Appropriations bills: A Key Tool of Congressional Policymaking

Matt Glassman | May 6, 2019

Early last week, the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies released its draft FY2020 bill, and subsequently approved it in a markup held on Wednesday. In some respects, this was all very normal; the MilCon bill (as it is widely known) is often one of the first appropriations


The Aftermath

Laura Blessing | December 6, 2018

Another election cycle has washed over our nation’s capital.  As outgoing members clear out their desks and incoming members eye their new offices, Congress gets ready for the next phase.  It’s time to adjust to the aftermath of the election results, their ongoing appropriations work, other lame duck session policy attempts, a budget process


Congress in 2018: What’s left?

Josh Huder | March 5, 2018

Last month Congress struck a two-year deal that greases the budget wheels to the tune of an extra $320 billion. While political posturing and two brief government shutdowns hampered bipartisan negotiations, congressional leaders in the House and Senate ultimately settled on a budget that outlines discretionary spending, lifts the Budget Control Act’s(aka sequestration) caps


Victims of Their Own Success

Laura Blessing | December 21, 2017

The Republican Party has become a victim of its own success.  Given their legislative, administrative, and impending electoral challenges, this may sound odd.  But on their biggest policy priority, tax policy, they may have been too successful.  And those previous successes combined with the tax bill passed this week may just imperil their reputation as


Why Tax Reform Is Hard

As we noted in our last newsletter, September was, perhaps, the cruelest month.  A bevy of high stakes deadlines (and potential crises) loomed— many, but not all, were met.  But the real blow to the party in power was the failure to meet a parliamentarian-decreed deadline to repeal and replace


Secrecy in Lawmaking and What it Spells for the rest of the 115th

Josh Huder | July 24, 2017

The House and Senate efforts to repeal and replace versions of the Affordable Care Act have relied on an amazingly convoluted, opaque, and covert process. It was, and is, a stunning display of haste and hubris, well outside the norms of the modern legislative process. Speaker Ryan dropped the American Health Care Act (AHCA) practically


What We’re Reading

GAI | May 9, 2017

We are living in interesting times.  In order to bring you more insight on the issues of the day, we thought we’d send out a sampling of what we’re reading in the office.  There’s a lot going on in addition to the recent budget developments that Josh Huder ably covers in his piece for this


On Congress: A few Farewell Thoughts

Kenneth Gold | January 12, 2017

When the 115th Congress convened last week it was immediately faced with a range of important issues: the promised repeal of Obamacare, the passing of an FY17 budget resolution, proposals for major tax reform, an overhaul of entitlement programs, what to do about the massive federal debt, and a full slate of confirmation hearings in


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