Media Center



NameThe Government Affairs Institute is an authority on Congress. All Senior Fellows are experienced observers of Congress who come from backgrounds in political science, public administration, history, economics, among others, and have taught extensively at the university level.

The GAI office of communications works with the media as an extension of the Institute’s mission to educate about Congress. Senior Fellows work with media regarding Congress and the federal government, specifically related to their areas of expertise.

To contact a member of the faculty you can email us at gai@georgetown.edu.


Fellows In The News

Expert Reactions to Government Shutdown

GAI | October 22, 2013

Senior Fellow Josh Huder followed-up to his October 4 post — written with Senior Fellow Marian Currinder on Speaker Boehner’s ability to negotiate a compromise — with a post on the budget outlook: “In the wake of the government shutdown and near default on the nation’s debt, one

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WaPo Roundup of House Vote Commentary

GAI | October 17, 2013

Jonathan Bernstein cited Josh Huder’s blog post on the outlook for the Boehner speakership following last night’s House vote. The House Vote 550 passed the Senate Budget Compromise bill which reopened all government functions. The bill passed with only 87 Republican votes; 144 Republicans voted against the bill.    

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Huder: On Federal Shutdown Affecting Travelers

Josh Huder | October 10, 2013

Christopher Elliott for the Washington Post explores how the federal government shutdown is affecting travelers around the United States. “When a gridlocked Congress shuttered vast sections of the federal government on Oct. 1 and furloughed 800,000 workers, its decision touched tourists in unexpected ways, from abruptly canceling a camping trip in a national

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Lagon: A Knockout Blow for Campaign Finance Laws

GAI | October 8, 2013

The Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling in 2010 delivered a wallop that left federal campaign finance regulations reeling, but McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission threatens to land the knockout blow. Throughout the nearly four decades since its decision in Buckley v. Valeo, the court has consistently recognized a key distinction between contributions made directly to

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