Committees



It’s more than just bad process. It’s harmful.

There’s a lot of ​talk about the broken processes in the House and Senate, particularly around the health​ ​care bill. Extraordinary secrecy has been employed to push the AHCA through the House and the BCRA through the Senate. ​In fact, t​here’s so much commentary about how “broken” the institution is that people are overlooking what


Secrecy in Lawmaking and What it Spells for the rest of the 115th

Josh Huder | July 24, 2017

The House and Senate efforts to repeal and replace versions of the Affordable Care Act have relied on an amazingly convoluted, opaque, and covert process. It was, and is, a stunning display of haste and hubris, well outside the norms of the modern legislative process. Speaker Ryan dropped the American Health Care Act (AHCA) practically


Looking Towards 2017: National Security in Focus

GAI | December 1, 2016

With the election over and cabinet hopefuls parading to Trump Tower, political prognosticators are looking towards 2017.  What will the incoming presidential administration and unified Republican government mean for policy and politics?  The congressional experts at GAI are weighing in with a series of deeper dives on different subject areas.  Below are the contributions for


New Republican rule complicates Rep. Paul Ryan’s future

New House Republican Conference rules prevent members seeking higher office to hold committee and subcommittee chairs. Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK) said, the “idea is not to have major committees, appropriations or subcommittees chaired by people who are running for the Senate. If you’re shuttling back and forth, that’s just a huge problem for


A History of Violence

Last Friday Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) announced that he would appoint a select committee to further investigate the September 11, 2012 terrorist attacks on the U.S. diplomatic compound and the CIA facility in Benghazi, Libya. This decision comes in the midst of a midterm election season and predictably it has generated panoply of partisan


Senatorial Courtesy, Blue Slips Caught in the Fallout

Ian Millhiser has a very good piece on judicial nominations and blue slips over at Think Progress. It covers a lot of ground and is a wonderful read. However, I do have some bones to pick with his take. At the core of Millhiser’s argument are blue slips and their place in Senate history.


Whose Bill Is It Anyway?

Congressman Mike Rogers’s recent announcement that he will not seek reelection this November received a fair amount of news coverage. This is hardly surprising since he is the Chairman of the high-profile House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. While the media reported widely on the “succession race” for the chairman’s job, another consequential development barely